A BBC journalist died of complications from the AstraZeneca vaccine, research shows

A BBC journalist died of complications from the AstraZeneca vaccine, research shows

Spread the love

A BBC journalist died of complications from the AstraZeneca vaccine, research shows

The journalist Lisa Shaw, working for BBC Radio Newcastle, died aged 44 in May after developing Headaches, one week after receiving your first dose of the coronavirus vaccine.

The Newcastle coroner, Karen dilks, confirmed without hesitation that the presenter suffered blood clots in the brain that ultimately led to her death. “Lisa died of complications after receiving the AstraZeneca vaccine.” This is the first case in the UK where the COVID vaccine is officially recognized as an “underlying cause” of death.

The coroner, as confirmed by the BBC network itself, He said Shaw was fit and well, but concluded it was “clearly established” that his death was due to a very rare “vaccine-induced thrombotic thrombocytopenia,” a condition that leads to swelling and bleeding of the brain.

Lisa Shaw died on May 21 at age 44.

The Lisa Shaw case, which made the cover of The Daily Mail, caused concern in the UK, despite official insistence that there were only 417 cases of blood clots in the nearly 50 million doses of AstraZeneca supplied to date.

The Medicines Regulatory Agency (MHRA) maintains that the proportion of registered cases is barely 15 in a million. Even so, it is estimated that up to 72 Britons have died to date from complications related to the COVID vaccine, although the case of Lisa Shaw is the first officially recognized by a coroner.

A BBC journalist died of complications from the AstraZeneca vaccine, research shows

The Medicines Regulatory Agency (MHRA) maintains that the proportion of registered cases is only 15 in a million. Photo: AFP

Intense headache

Shaw received his first dose of the vaccine on April 29. On May 13, she was taken by ambulance to North Durham University Hospital after having a headache for several days.

In a statement, Dr. John Holmes, who treated her, said she complained of having a “severe, stabbing, stabbing headache” on her forehead and behind her eyes. Tests were carried out and blood clots were found in her brain, leading her to the specialist neurology unit at the Royal Victoria Infirmary (RVI) in Newcastle.

A BBC journalist died of complications from the AstraZeneca vaccine, research shows

Karen Dilks, the Newcastle coroner who confirmed the reason for the journalist’s death.

Clots are considered extremely rare after 24.8 million first doses and 23.9 million second doses of the AstraZeneca vaccine in the UK.

Dr. Christopher Johnson, consultant in anesthesia and intensive care, said that Shaw had been conscious for several days and she had been treated for the clots with medications that appeared to be successful.

But on the night of May 16, Shaw said the headaches were worse and that had difficulty speaking. The scans showed that he had suffered a hemorrhage in his brain and, after his condition worsened, part of his skull was removed to try to relieve the pressure inside his head.

His condition continued to deteriorate and, despite more surgeries and treatments, he died on May 21.

A BBC journalist died of complications from the AstraZeneca vaccine, research shows

The journalist died from the side effects of the AstraZeneca vaccine.

In the one-hour court hearing, pathologist Tuomo Polvikoski stressed how the 44-year-old presenter was in good health before being inoculated. “The clinical evidence strongly supports the idea that the brain clot was in fact induced by the vaccine.”Polvikoski declared. “It is the most likely explanation.”

Dr Sue Pavord, from the University of Oxford (who collaborated in the development of the AstraZeneca vaccine), stressed in a press conference before health journalists that a reaction to the vaccine like the one that caused the death of Lisa Shaw is “very rare”.