New genetic markers for a rare form of diabetes 1

New genetic markers for a rare form of diabetes 1

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New genetic markers for a rare form of diabetes 1

While most cases of type 1 diabetes are classified as autoimmune diseases, a smaller percentage of these patients have the non-immune-mediated type 1 diabetes, sometimes referred to as type 1 B diabetes. The researchers of the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) they identified 41 genetic markers previously not reported for this less common version of type 1 diabetes.

New genetic markers for a rare form of diabetes 1

Furthermore, 16 of these markers have been linked to autism spectrum disorder in previous studies, suggesting that there may be a genetic link between the two conditions.

The results of the study were recently published in the journal CommunicationsBiology.

New genetic markers: here’s what the research says

Approximately 5-10% of Caucasian patients diagnosed with type 1 diabetes have a non-autoimmune diagnosis. Previous research has speculated that several mechanisms must be at play. In this study, CHOP researchers and collaborators studied 18,949 patients of European descent, including 6,599 patients with type 1 diabetes and 12,323 patients of the group of check.

The study found 957 patients with low genetic risk scores for type 1 diabetes and, Through an analysis focused on the whole genome association study (GWAS), these patients contributed to the 41 new genetic markers we discovered for type 1 diabetes.

Two of these newly identified genetic markers were considered common variants and one marker was associated with interferon reporting related to influenza viral infection, which supports previous findings that Viral infections can not only trigger, but potentially cause some cases of type 1 diabetes.

New genetic markers for a rare form of diabetes 1

New genetic markers for a rare form of diabetes 1

Other genetic markers were related to pancreatitis, higher body mass index, and obesity, all conditions that increase the risk of developing type 1 diabetes.

“More research will be needed to determine the exact nature of the effect these genetic markers have on the development of type 1 diabetes and whether they are truly distinct from the genetic causes of the autoimmune form of the disease.“Concluded the senior author Hakon. Hakonarson, MD, PhD, Director of the Center for Applied Genomics at CHOP. These rare variants may suggest the possibility of rare syndromic types of disease that have clinical features of both type 1 diabetes and autism spectrum disorder that has not previously been identified. “

Genetic markers in diabetes: Genetic differences help distinguish type 1 diabetes from diabetes 1.5

A group of scientists led by the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) has identified one genetic signature that could help distinguish an adult-onset form of diabetes that shares many features of type 1 diabetes (T1D) from pediatric-onset T1D, opening the door to potentially more direct diagnostic tests for the adult condition and improving responses by ensuring that patients receive the most effective treatment.

The study was published online on December 16, 2019 on Diabetes Care.

This is our first view of the hebetic differences between latent autoimmune diabetes in adults and type 1 diabetes in children that may be of diagnostic use “, said the leader of the Struan Grant, Ph.D., Co-Director of the Center for Spatial and FunctionalGenomics At CHOP, together toDaniel B. Burke for Diabetes Research. “We have found a genetic means of discriminating between the two conditions without costly and cumbersome anti-truck screening“.

Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) is sometimes referred to as “type 1.5 diabetes” because it shares the characteristics of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Like T1D, LADA produces autoantibodies that attack insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. However, like those with type 2 diabetes, patients with LADA are diagnosed in adulthood and do not require insulin at the time of diagnosis.

New genetic markers for a rare form of diabetes 1

New genetic markers for a rare form of diabetes 1