Rope walking  Four Germans walked on a rope between two fells for more than two kilometers in Swedish Lapland, video shows soari

Rope walking Four Germans walked on a rope between two fells for more than two kilometers in Swedish Lapland, video shows soari

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Rope walking  Four Germans walked on a rope between two fells for more than two kilometers in Swedish Lapland, video shows soari

The trip of more than two kilometers is a new world record in cable walking.

Swedish In Lapland’s mountain valley in Lapland, a new world record for cable walking was set over the weekend, according to the news agency Reuters.

On Saturday, four German cable walkers crossed a 2,130-meter-long wire tuned to a 600-meter-high U-shaped valley.

It is the longest rope walk in history.

A video of the spectacular performance can be watched at the beginning of this story.

First made a record trip Quirin Herterich, who commented on his performance to Reuters.

“I just focused on moving really slowly, being extremely flawless, and simply getting there,” Herterich said.

In addition to Herterich, the rope was also successfully crossed Lukas Irmler, Ruben Langer and Friedi Kuehne.

Tightrope walking is a team sport and the glory of the new world record will be shared by all the athletes who participated in the performance.

The crossing itself was also tried by many other members of the team, but only four managed to reach the finish line.

It took two days to get the wire between two 600-foot-high peaks.

The other end of the string to be crossed was first attached to the second peak and then transported by drone to the opposite peak. The walls of the Laporten valley would have been too steep to carry the rope by muscle.

Projects led by a Swede David Sjöström described the circumstances as challenging.

“This is really difficult because the place is really open, at an altitude of 600 meters, 2,150 meters long and at times really windy,” Sjöström described.

The world record venue Lapporten is located in the municipality of Kiruna in Lapland, Sweden.

“Lapporten is an iconic place and a really beautiful landmark for this whole area,” says Sjöström.

“When I started planning a new big rope walking project, I saw a picture of Lapporten. I hadn’t seen Lapporten in decades. As soon as I saw the picture, I knew it had to be crossed. ”