The Italian company that ‘controls’ Tesla’s batteries |  FormulaPassion.it

The Italian company that ‘controls’ Tesla’s batteries | FormulaPassion.it

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The Italian company that ‘controls’ Tesla’s batteries |  FormulaPassion.it

[Rassegna] – The Italian company Marposs it is fully part of the Emilian Motor Valley, with its headquarters in Bentivoglio in the province of Bologna, but on closer inspection its reality has an international dimension. The company (also) produces detection systems and quality control equipment for batteries of various automotive groups and brands, such as Tesla, Volkswagen, Daimler, Stellantis, Renault, Toyota. The company founded in 1952 brings together a patrol of 300 researchers, twenty factories around the world and a turnover of nearly half a billion euros. He recently made a purchase campaign in Germany, taking over Movomatic from the giant Jenoptik, to increase solutions in the field of high-precision measurement and control.

The skills and technologies developed for the automotive industry have prompted us to study new applications in other worlds, such as aeronautics and now also biomedical, a sector that my son Francesco is making grow»Said Stefano Possati, 70, president of the company, according to the magazine L’Economia. Possati also spoke about the green turning point of the auto industry.

The position of the European Union, in particular of France and Germany, is much more radical than the American one, more uncertain. European manufacturers want to move forward towards green conversion. It is possible to emerge stronger from change and crises. In recent times we have also developed the technology for the inspection and monitoring of batteries that work with fuel cells for hydrogen in view of the development of new alternative energies for sustainable mobility. Our most recent investments (28 acquisitions from 2000 to today) they went to strengthen the electricity sector. If we had not carried out this intense shopping campaign over time, today we would have about 40% less revenues and, perhaps, more of a difficulty in staying on the market.»Explained the son of the company founder, Mario Possati.

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