The long-term effects of Covid-19 have been studied at the U of C clinic, with promising results leading to treatment

The long-term effects of Covid-19 have been studied at the U of C clinic, with promising results leading to treatment

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The long-term effects of Covid-19 have been studied at the U of C clinic, with promising results leading to treatment

There are still plenty of strangers with COVID-19, and researchers from the University of Calgary are planning to find out more by investigating the long-term effects the disease can have on the body.

A new study led by Dr. Satish Raj, a professor of cardiology at U of C, works with those who have “long covid”, which is actually used to describe those who have symptoms three months later.

These symptoms include rapid heartbeat, mild headaches and shortness of breath, he says.

“There are so many differences and we’re starting to understand that,” he said.

And this is not normal. Raj says some studies show this can occur in 30 to 40 percent of cases.

“Other studies have shown this number may be in the range of five per cent, which may not seem like a big number. But if you multiply it by the number of people who have COVID, not just the hospital, it’s a big impact.”

People’s demographics get longer covid range and otherwise healthy people may now have trouble getting from the bedroom to the bathroom.

“The challenge is that we see different symptoms in these patients, but we don’t have an understanding of what the problem is,” he said.

“And so we’re approaching from our area of ​​expertise, which is studying autonomic nervous system disorders.”

Cross-Canada study

Raj, a clinician-scientist at the Libin Cardiovascular Institute, has seen a significant increase in the number of people receiving treatment at the Calgary Autonomic Investigation and Management Clinic.

For the study, they say it will be conducted in six locations across Canada and includes 180 long-term Covid patients and 40 heath control subjects.

From there, the group undergoes physiological treatment and is evaluated for measurable problems of the autonomic nervous system, such as heart rate, breathing and blood pressure.

“We constantly monitor their blood pressure and we watch them sleep, stand up, and put pressure on the autonomic nervous system,” he said.

The goal is to eventually provide better treatment and develop targeted therapies for people dealing with long covid symptoms.

“The goal is to tell us how to treat it properly if we don’t understand what the problem is physically,” he said.

“Practically one of our strategies is to try to increase the blood intake and dietary salt and water intake in these patients, get more blood back into the heart and reduce tachycardia (hypertension).”And pounding that way. ”

The study is just beginning, and Raj says he is looking to begin recruiting participants through referrals from long covid clinics and emails of participants before the end of October.

Doctors hope to be able to share some of this research by the end of 2022.

With files from Home Stretch.