Travel restrictions  Entering Finland is not easy at once: What does Thursday’s border decision mean and where can I come

Travel restrictions Entering Finland is not easy at once: What does Thursday’s border decision mean and where can I come

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Travel restrictions  Entering Finland is not easy at once: What does Thursday’s border decision mean and where can I come

Policy|Travel restrictions

Internal border controls will continue in the EU and Schengen area until 25 July, but will leave on Monday for those arriving from Lithuania, Slovenia and Switzerland.

Government decided on Thursday to continue internal border controls until July 25 due to the coronavirus situation.

The decision enabling internal border control will enter into force on Monday, July 12, and it aims to prevent the spread of virus variants to Finland.

On the same Monday, a new entry model valid until mid-October will also enter into force, which will determine, among other things, who should take coronavirus tests after entering the country. An entry model that allows for freer travel the government said on Tuesday.

So how do today’s decision and the entry model presented on Tuesday affect each other, and under what conditions will you be able to enter the country in the future?

Thursday The decision made on internal border control means that travel to Finland will not be easier in the coming weeks.

In practice, Finland will only be admitted from the EU and Schengen countries until 25 July if the country’s incidence rate is less than 25 or newcomers have received both coronavirus vaccines. Alternatively, the entrant must prove that they have been infected with the coronavirus within six months.

If these conditions are not met, you can enter Finland from the EU and Schengen countries only for a necessary reason or on a business trip.

In practice, this means that those countries that have hitherto been subject to internal border controls will continue to do so. Only for Lithuania, Slovenia and Switzerland will internal border controls be lifted on Monday.

In the past, internal border controls have been lifted for arrivals from Iceland, Italy, Austria, Liechtenstein, Malta, Poland, Germany, Slovakia, the Czech Republic and Hungary due to their low incidence rates.

EU and Schengen countries from outside, so-called third countries, Finland may come to the EU green list of countries with an incidence rate of less than 25. When arriving from other third countries, there must be a necessary reason.

Thus, you cannot enter Finland from third countries such as Britain, even if you have received both coronavirus vaccines or have been proven to be infected with coronavirus within six months.

For third countries, the incidence rate is low enough to enter Finland in Albania, Australia, South Korea, Hong Kong, Israel, Japan, Lebanon, Macao, Northern Macedonia, Singapore, Taiwan and New Zealand.

Transit from Helsinki-Vantaa Airport, on the other hand, is always allowed if you meet the arrival requirements of the destination country of your trip.

Provided however, a person entering the country meets the entry requirements under internal border control may be required to take a coronavirus test according to the new entry model if the incidence rate in the country of origin is more than ten.

The arrival of tourists will therefore be assessed in two different stages from Monday.

The model attempts to identify potential carriers of the coronavirus already at the border. The entry requirements depend on the coverage of the newcomer’s vaccine protection, the possible illness, the pre-test or the country from which you enter Finland.

Read more: This is how the border measures for those entering Finland change: One vaccination for a follow-up test with the threat of a fine, from a few countries to Finland without a certificate

Internal border control at Finland’s borders is expected to end on Monday, July 26. After the end of internal border controls, therefore, only health security measures in accordance with the new entry model will remain in force.